Database syndict: Unavailable. (Failed to open b-tree)
Database syndict: Synonym dictionary unavailable

Children's Literature Reviews
Item 1 of 1

Holocaust study [kit]
[compiled by the Resource Centre staff]
Kitchener, ON : WCDSB, 1998.
67 books (multiple copies of most titles), 2 reproduced articles

Annotations:

Number the stars, by Lois Lowry won the 1990 Newbery medal.
Includes bibliographical references.
After the war / C. Matas (4c) -- Alicia : my story / A. Appleman-Jurman (3c) -- Anne Frank, beyond the diary : a photographic remembrance -- Anne Frank : the diary of a young girl (10 c.) -- Anne Frank's Tales from the secret annex (3c) -- The cage / R. Sender (6c) -- Daniel's story / C. Matas (5c) -- The devil's arithmetic / J. Yolen (3c) -- Friedrich / H. Richter (3c) -- Good-bye Marianne / I. Watts (6 c) -- The death camps / W. Lace -- The final solution / E. Rice -- The Nazis / W. Lace -- Nazi war criminals / E. Rice -- The resistance / D. Bachrach -- The righteous gentiles / V. Sherrow -- The survivors / E. Ayer -- I am David / A. Holm (5c) -- Night / E. Wiesel (6c) -- Number the stars / L. Lowry (2c)-- A picture book of Anne Frank / D. Adler (2c) -- Tell no one who you are / W. Buchignani (2c) -- Exploring the holocaust / R. Fox [in Emergency librarian 24:5] -- Talking about books : bringing life's issues into classrooms [in Language arts v.74, no. 6]
A collection of historical novels, biographies, memoirs and other nonfiction about the Nazis' program to eliminate the Jews of Europe, as well as other groups deemed "unfit"
Gr.6-8.

Best Books:

Adventuring with Books: A Booklist for PreK-Grade 6, 12th Edition, 1999 ; National Council of Teachers of English; United States
Books for You: An Annotated Booklist for Senior High, Fourteenth Edition, 2001 ; National Council of Teachers of English; United States
Books for You: An Annotated Booklist for Senior High, Thirteenth Edition, 1997 ; National Council of Teachers of English; United States
Books for You: An Annotated Booklist for Senior High, Twelfth Edition, 1995 ; National Council of Teachers of English; United States
Children's Catalog, Eighteenth Edition, 2001 ; H.W. Wilson; United States
Middle And Junior High School Library Catalog, Eighth Edition, 2000 ; H.W. Wilson; United States
Middle and Junior High School Library Catalog, Ninth Edition, 2005 ; H.W. Wilson; United States
Senior High School Library Catalog, Fifteenth Edition, 1997 ; H.W. Wilson; United States
Senior High School Library Catalog, Sixteenth Edition, 2002 ; H.W. Wilson; United States
Senior High School Library Catalog, Supplement to the Fifteenth Edition, 1998 ; H.W. Wilson; United States
YALSA Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults, 2003 ; American Library Association; United States

Awards, Honors, Prizes:

Charlie May Simon Children's Book Award, 1991-1992 Winner Grades 4-6 Arkansas
Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children's Book Award, 1991 Winner Vermont
Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction for Young People, 1994 Finalist Canada
Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction for Young People, 1997 Finalist Canada
Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction for Young People, 1998 Winner Canada
Golden Archer Award, 1990 Winner The Golden Archer Award Wisconsin
Golden Archer Award, 1998 Winner Middle / Junior High Wisconsin
Governor General's Literary Awards, 1993 Finalist Children's Literature (Text) Canada
John Newbery Medal, 1990 Winner United States
Maine Student Book Award, 1991 Winner Maine
Manitoba Young Readers' Choice Award, 1996 Winner Manitoba, Canada
Mildred L. Batchelder Award, 1972 Winner United States
National Jewish Book Award, 1990 Winner United States
Rebecca Caudill Young Readers' Book Award, 1992 Winner Illinois
Sydney Taylor Book Award, 1989 Winner Older Readers United States

State and Provincial Reading Lists:

3 Apples Book Award, 2010 ; Finalist; New York
Battle of the Books, 2010-2011 ; Nominee; Intermediate; New Mexico
Manitoba Young Readers' Choice Award, 1996 ; Nominee; Manitoba, Canada
Rebecca Caudill Young Readers' Book Award, 1997 ; Nominee; Illinois
Red Cedar Book Awards, 2000-2001 ; Nominee; Fiction; British Columbia, Canada
Red Maple Award, 1998 ; Nominee; Ontario, Canada
Silver Birch Award, 1999 ; Nominee; Fiction; Ontario, Canada

Curriculum Tools:

Link to Discussion Guide at Scholastic

Reading Measurement Programs:


Accelerated Reader" "
Interest Level Lower Grade" "
Book Level 4.7" "
Accelerated Reader Points 0.5" "
Accelerated Vocabulary" "

Accelerated Reader" "
Interest Level Middle Grade" "
Book Level 4.6" "
Accelerated Reader Points 6" "
Accelerated Vocabulary, Literacy Skills" "

Accelerated Reader" "
Interest Level Middle Grade" "
Book Level 4.7" "
Accelerated Reader Points 5" "
Accelerated Vocabulary" "

Accelerated Reader" "
Interest Level Middle Grade" "
Book Level 4.9" "
Accelerated Reader Points 5" "
Accelerated Vocabulary" "

Accelerated Reader" "
Interest Level Middle Grade" "
Book Level 5.2" "
Accelerated Reader Points 6" "" "

Accelerated Reader" "
Interest Level Upper Grade" "
Book Level 3.7" "
Accelerated Reader Points 6" "
Accelerated Vocabulary" "

Accelerated Reader" "
Interest Level Upper Grade" "
Book Level 4.5" "
Accelerated Reader Points 3" "" "

Accelerated Reader" "
Interest Level Upper Grade" "
Book Level 4.8" "
Accelerated Reader Points 4" "
Accelerated Vocabulary, Literacy Skills" "

Accelerated Reader" "
Interest Level Upper Grade" "
Book Level 5.9" "
Accelerated Reader Points 5" "" "

Accelerated Reader" "
Interest Level Upper Grade" "
Book Level 6.1" "
Accelerated Reader Points 25" "" "

Accelerated Reader" "
Interest Level Upper Grade" "
Book Level 6.5" "
Accelerated Reader Points 14" "
Accelerated Vocabulary" "

Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.
Adult Directed
Lexile Measure 800

Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.
Lexile Measure 1080

Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.
Lexile Measure 590

Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.
Lexile Measure 670

Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.
Lexile Measure 720

Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.
Lexile Measure 730

Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.
Lexile Measure 880

Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.
Lexile Measure 950

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 3-5
Reading Level 5
Title Point Value 2
Lexile Measure AD 800

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 3-5
Reading Level 5
Title Point Value 3
Lexile Measure 650

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 3-5
Reading Level 5
Title Point Value 7
Lexile Measure 670

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 5
Title Point Value 8
Lexile Measure 730

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 6
Title Point Value 11
Lexile Measure 720

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 6
Title Point Value 21
Lexile Measure 1080

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 6
Title Point Value 6
Lexile Measure 1030

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 6
Title Point Value 7
Lexile Measure 720

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 7
Title Point Value 10
Lexile Measure 950

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level High School
Reading Level 6
Title Point Value 6
Lexile Measure 500

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level High School
Reading Level 8
Title Point Value 29
Lexile Measure 880

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level High School
Reading Level 9
Title Point Value 6
Lexile Measure 590

Reviews:

Hazel Rochman (Booklist, August 1998 (Vol. 94, No. 22))
Dogs and Jews not admitted." Watts was one of the 10,000 Jewish children who were sent from Nazi Europe to Britain in the Kindertransport rescue operation in 1938; her moving autobiographical novel personalizes what it was like to be a Jewish child in Berlin at the time. Marianne Kohn, 11, is locked out of her Berlin school; synagogues and Jewish shops are looted and burned; her father is in hiding; the streets are loud with violence and marching Nazi youth. As the violence gets closer and Marianne must hole up in her apartment, she fiercely resists her mother's decision to send her away. Olga Drucker's Kindertransport (1992) and Dorith Sim's picture book In My Pocket (1997) tell of the children's leaving and their journey to foster homes. Here the focus is on the racist persecution that drove parents to send their children away to safety. The mother is idealized, but her heartbreaking letter to Marianne ("One day you will understand why I had to let you go") is as unforgettable as their anguished parting. Category: Middle Readers. 1998, Tundra, $7.95. Gr. 5-8.

Hazel Rochman (Booklist, October 1, 1997 (Vol. 94, No. 3))
This is a multi-book review. See also the title The Final Solution. This is Holocaust history for readers old enough to face the nightmare horror in considerable detail and to think about how and why it could have happened. Part of a planned seven-volume Holocaust Library series, these in-depth, readable accounts draw on authoritative scholarly sources--including the works of Shirer, Gilbert, Arendt, and Dawidowicz, and also Daniel Goldhagen's newly published and controversial Hitler's Willing Executioners (1996)--to document, describe, and analyze the genocide of six million Jews. Except for passing references to the other five million victims, the focus is only on the Jews. The volume on the Nazis traces the history of anti-Semitism in Germany from the time of Martin Luther to the rise of Hitler. The epilogue, "Who was to blame?" , will stimulate discussion about other genocides in history and about the role of ordinary people who did nothing. The approach is in no way sensationalized, but the collective biography Nazi War Criminals may be more than most readers can bear to read: there are even pictures of the atrocious medical experiments conducted by Mengele on children without anesthesia. The Final Solution provides an excellent historical overview of what happened to the Jews from the rise of Hitler to the liberation of the camps. There is also graphic coverage (including photos) of the massacres at places such as Baba Yar. Rice discusses the arguments of various scholars, including the "intentionalists" (who say that the Nazis intended from the start to annihilate the Jews) and the "functionalists" (who argue that the genocide was more the result of the Nazis' chaotic decision making). The design is clear, with black-and-white photos on nearly every page and with sidebars of eyewitness accounts and quotes from primary sources. Each book has full chapter notes, excellent annotated bibliographies, a chronology, and a glossary. This series will serve YAs--and adults--as a transition from the one-volume accounts, such as Bachrach's Tell Them We Remember (1994), to scholarly adult histories. Category: Older Readers. 1997, Lucent, $17.96. Gr. 10-12.

Hazel Rochman (Booklist, October 1, 1997 (Vol. 94, No. 3))
This is a multi-book review: See also the title The Nazis. See also the title Nazi War Criminals. This is Holocaust history for readers old enough to face the nightmare horror in considerable detail and to think about how and why it could have happened. Part of a planned seven-volume Holocaust Library series, these in-depth, readable accounts draw on authoritative scholarly sources--including the works of Shirer, Gilbert, Arendt, and Dawidowicz, and also Daniel Goldhagen's newly published and controversial Hitler's Willing Executioners (1996)--to document, describe, and analyze the genocide of six million Jews. Except for passing references to the other five million victims, the focus is only on the Jews. The volume on the Nazis traces the history of anti-Semitism in Germany from the time of Martin Luther to the rise of Hitler. The epilogue, "Who was to blame?" , will stimulate discussion about other genocides in history and about the role of ordinary people who did nothing. The approach is in no way sensationalized, but the collective biography Nazi War Criminals may be more than most readers can bear to read: there are even pictures of the atrocious medical experiments conducted by Mengele on children without anesthesia. The Final Solution provides an excellent historical overview of what happened to the Jews from the rise of Hitler to the liberation of the camps. There is also graphic coverage (including photos) of the massacres at places such as Baba Yar. Rice discusses the arguments of various scholars, including the "intentionalists" (who say that the Nazis intended from the start to annihilate the Jews) and the "functionalists" (who argue that the genocide was more the result of the Nazis' chaotic decision making). The design is clear, with black-and-white photos on nearly every page and with sidebars of eyewitness accounts and quotes from primary sources. Each book has full chapter notes, excellent annotated bibliographies, a chronology, and a glossary. This series will serve YAs--and adults--as a transition from the one-volume accounts, such as Bachrach's Tell Them We Remember (1994), to scholarly adult histories. Category: Older Readers. 1997, Lucent, $17.96. Gr. 10-12.

Hazel Rochman (Booklist, October 1, 1997 (Vol. 94, No. 3))
This is a multi-book review: See also the title The Final Solution. This is Holocaust history for readers old enough to face the nightmare horror in considerable detail and to think about how and why it could have happened. Part of a planned seven-volume Holocaust Library series, these in-depth, readable accounts draw on authoritative scholarly sources--including the works of Shirer, Gilbert, Arendt, and Dawidowicz, and also Daniel Goldhagen's newly published and controversial Hitler's Willing Executioners (1996)--to document, describe, and analyze the genocide of six million Jews. Except for passing references to the other five million victims, the focus is only on the Jews. The volume on the Nazis traces the history of anti-Semitism in Germany from the time of Martin Luther to the rise of Hitler. The epilogue, "Who was to blame?" , will stimulate discussion about other genocides in history and about the role of ordinary people who did nothing. The approach is in no way sensationalized, but the collective biography Nazi War Criminals may be more than most readers can bear to read: there are even pictures of the atrocious medical experiments conducted by Mengele on children without anesthesia. The Final Solution provides an excellent historical overview of what happened to the Jews from the rise of Hitler to the liberation of the camps. There is also graphic coverage (including photos) of the massacres at places such as Baba Yar. Rice discusses the arguments of various scholars, including the "intentionalists" (who say that the Nazis intended from the start to annihilate the Jews) and the "functionalists" (who argue that the genocide was more the result of the Nazis' chaotic decision making). The design is clear, with black-and-white photos on nearly every page and with sidebars of eyewitness accounts and quotes from primary sources. Each book has full chapter notes, excellent annotated bibliographies, a chronology, and a glossary. This series will serve YAs--and adults--as a transition from the one-volume accounts, such as Bachrach's Tell Them We Remember (1994), to scholarly adult histories. Category: Older Readers. 1997, Lucent, $17.96. Gr. 10-12.

Val Randall (Books for Keeps No. 48, January 1988)
The explicit details of Holocaust literature tend to excite the voyeur in the most noble of readers. This is a trap which this novel neatly avoids because it is written through a child's eyes. In the first, Friedrich, his best friend tells the story of the systematic persecution of a German Jewish family in the Second World War. The language is simple, the story the more appalling for its matter-of-fact tone. Not entertaining literature, but a book which needs to be read --- by capable second and third years --- possibly as a class set for the latter. Category: Older Readers. . ...., Puffin, D1.75. Ages 15 to adult.

Betty Hicks (Children's Literature)
Originally published in 1988, this award-winning novel about the Holocaust continues to have significance and appeal. Twelve-year-old Hannah is weary of observing Jewish holidays because she's "tired of remembering." During the Passover Seder, she finds herself mysteriously transported back to Nazi-occupied Poland in 1942. Her memories of 1990's America gradually fade, replaced by the horrors of her life in a concentration camp. Yolen depicts the harsh realities honestly, but compassionately, in this unforgettable story about survival, friendship, and remembering. Today's readers, increasingly dealing with issues of violence and prejudice, will especially value the learned skills Hannah utilizes to live with day to day hardship. This story does more than just remember the victims; it honors the survivors, and reminds that even in the midst of unspeakable sorrow, "the swallows still sing around the smokestacks." 1990 (orig. 1988), Penguin/Puffin Books, $13.00 and $4.99. Ages 10 up.

Judy Silverman (Children's Literature)
As German Jews realized what was going to happen to them, many of them tried to get out of Germany. If they couldn't, they tried at least to make sure their children would be safe. Trains called Kindertransporte saved thousands of Jewish children, shipping them to England where they would live for the duration of the war. This is the story of one of those children. It follows Marianne Kohn through the autumn of 1938 as her world falls apart, and as her parents try to send her away. A good companion volume to the Edith Baer novels Frost in the Night and Walk the Dark Streets. Heartbreaking, honest, and very readable. Recommended. 1998, Tundra, $7.95. Ages 12 up.

Deborah Mervold (CM Magazine, February 13, 1998 (Vol. IV, No. 12))
The award-winning novel After the War tells the story of Ruth Mendenberg, a Polish teenager, who has survived World War II in Auschwitz only to return to her home to find it occupied by her German servant. Ruth, 15, begins to search for any remaining family in the town's city hall where she has little success, but she does meet up with a Jewish underground organization that smuggles illegal immigrants into Palestine. Because she has no home or family, Ruth joins a group of children who are being smuggled through Europe in the hope that Britain will allow them into Palestine. The story is based on actual events that occurred between 1946-49 during the struggle for a Jewish homeland. The story tells of the group's journey from country to country as they are sometimes helped and other times hindered in their travels. The group does not know whom to trust or, at times, where to turn. When they finally reach Italy and are put on a boat for Palestine, Ruth finds her brother Simon. An informative sidelight involves the various political groups that court the Jewish refugees. Simon becomes part of the Betar and later the Irgun, an Orthodox militant faction, whereas Ruth joins the Haganah, a group that will fight only for defense and will not initiate aggression. Interspersed throughout the novel are Ruth's memories of her earlier years, the happy family times, and the period in the concentration camp. The memories appear in a different font and appear less and less as the novel progresses and Ruth is forced to come to grips with her past. Her journey with the children helps her to face her demons as she is instructed to listen to their stories. It is in the telling of their stories that they can accept the past and face the future. The novel's hopeful nature implies that there is strength and beauty in human nature which is hidden in deep places but which, for lasting survival, must surface. The novel ends with the arrival at the kibbutz in Israel of Ruth and her companions. After the War is highly recommended as a reading choice for the middle years. It adds a detailed understanding of the period immediately after the Second World War and the difficulties faced by those who survived the conflict's horrors. Highly recommended. Rating: **** /4. Grades 6 - 9. 1996, Scholastic Canada, 137 pp., paper, $4.99. Ages 11 to 14.

Mary Thomas (CM Magazine, October 30, 1998 (Vol. V, No. 5))
Good-bye Marianne is a very quiet book. It does not shout the inequities of pre-war Germany, but it makes the reader aware of them by that very quality of underemphasis. Marianne is an 11-year-old girl who likes school, hates math, has friends, plays games, skips rope, just like other girls her age, but she is a Jew, and this is Germany in 1938. The story opens with her arriving at school to find the doors locked against her and the notice, "As of today, Jewish students are prohibited from attending German schools" stuck to the door. Her father has already "gone underground," moving from place to place to avoid being arrested; she and her mother make the best of things even as everything deteriorates around them, with their one hope being an exit permit for the whole family. This dream does not come true. In the end, Marianne's mother is able to get Marianne a place on the first of the Kinderstransport - a relief effort aimed at getting children out of Germany. In all, this organization rescued over 10,000 children, saving them from almost certain death at the expense of removing them from country, friends and family. Marianne's close relationship with her mother, contrasted with the atrocities she sees daily in the city, helps the reader to understand just how traumatic the times were and how desperate were the measures that had to be taken. Readers rejoice with Marianne as she disembarks in England - but do not learn what happens to her parents. For those who think that the war was a time for heroics and wonderful opportunities for bravery, this book points out the reasons why it had to happen and the drab dreadfulness it brought with it for most people. The spark of hope that is a common ingredient of children's literature is found not only in Marianne's escape from Berlin but also in a card she is given by a friend as she is about to leave the country. The donor was a true Aryan German, a member of the Hitler Youth, but when confronted with the realization that Marianne is Jewish, he managed to affirm friendship and say "We are not all the same!" Thusly, the seeds of post-war reconciliation are planted even before the actual fighting began. Recommended. Rating: *** /4. Grades 4 - 7. 1998, Tundra Books, 105 pp., paper, $8.99. Ages 9 to 12.

Kirkus (Kirkus Reviews, 1993)
After witnessing the rising tide of anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany, Daniel is suddenly transported, at age 14, from his comfortable life in Frankfurt to a Polish ghetto, then to Auschwitz and Buchenwald--losing most of his family along the way, seeing Nazi brutality of both the casual and the calculated kind, and recording atrocities with a smuggled camera ("What has happened to me?...Who am I? Where am I going?"). Matas, explicating an exhibit of photos and other materials at the new United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, creates a convincing composite youth and experience--fictional but carefully based on survivors' accounts. It's a savage story with no attempt to soften the culpability of the German people; Daniel's profound anger is easier to understand than is his father's compassion or his sister's plea to "chose love. Always choose love." Daniel survives to be reunited, after the war, with his wife-to-be, but his dying friend's last word echoes beyond the happy ending: "Remember..." An unusual undertaking, effectively carried out. Chronology; glossary. 1993, Scholastic, $13.95; paper $3.95. © 1993 Kirkus Reviews/VNU eMedia, Inc. All rights reserved.

Wendy E. Betts (KLIATT Review, July 1993 (Vol. 27, No. 4))
Published in conjunction with an exhibit at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, this is a fictional account of what happened to one Jewish boy and his family during the Holocaust. It traces the road to the concentration camps, from the earliest portents of danger--unbelievable to Daniel's family, in their own country--and the ever-increasing loss of civil liberties, to forced relocation to a Jewish ghetto, and finally to Auschwitz and Buchenwald, the camps designed for the systematic execution of millions of people. Through it all, as Daniel struggles to survive, he is faced with another struggle: holding on to hope and his own sense of humanity in the face of such overwhelming evil. Although the story does not quite succeed in showing the Holocaust through a teenager's eyes (it reads more like an adult's memory than an immediate experience), it has an undeniable authenticity. Forced to squeeze innumerable horrible events into a short book, Matas still manages to include the small details and cultural nuances (including Daniel's speech patterns) that make the story come to life, and she does not shy away from unpleasant facts: America's unwillingness to admit Jewish refugees; the continued hatred felt towards Jews in post-war Germany; and the rage, helplessness and need for revenge felt by camp survivors. Unfortunately, the book does not back itself up with any documentation, a peculiar omission. (Maps and a chronology are included, but they mainly follow the story.) Using a fictional form to make history more accessible to YAs is fine, but the sources--probably survivors' testimony--should be noted. Additionally, a bibliography of suggested readings would have been useful. KLIATT Codes: JS*--Exceptional book, recommended for junior and senior high school students. 1993, Scholastic, $3.95. Ages 12 to 18.

Joni Schockett (KLIATT Review, May 1999 (Vol. 33, No. 3))
Reva Minska was just a teenager when her family's once beloved landlady, Mrs. Gruber, betrayed them and turned them in to the Nazis. Reva stood horrified as SS Troopers stood guard and laughed while Mrs. Gruber took jewelry, fur coats and clothing that had belonged to Reva's family. The Nazis took furniture and the stove used to heat the house. Later, Mrs. Gruber returned to take food. Once a dear friend, overnight Mrs. Gruber had turned into a hated enemy as, it seemed, had all of Germany, which had suddenly turned violent against the Jews who so loved their country. This was the beginning of six years of war that Reva and her family had to endure. Her youngest brother died of typhus. All the children were sent to Auschwitz and more of Reva's family members died. Once one of seven children, Reva now counted three of her siblings, many aunts, uncles, young cousins and all her grandparents among those who died from disease, Nazi guns and the gas chambers. Reva faced a life-threatening infection and only the compassion of a guard saved her. Miraculously, Reva, a brother and two sisters survived the war. 1986, Bantam, $4.50. Ages 14 up.

E. Fox (Parent Council Volume 6)
Marianne Kohn is a young Jewish girl living in Berlin in 1938. Her biggest concern in life so far is her math grade. Then quickly and brutally her life is changed forever when the Nazis enact a series of laws designed to strip Jews of their rights. She is banned from school and forbidden to play with her childhood friends. Her family is evicted from their apartment, her father loses his business, and a warrant is issued for his arrest. Her mother then sends her to England for her own safety as part of the "Kinder Transport" organized by the British government. This poignant, believably-written novel is based on the true story of the ten thousand children who emigrated from Germany before the outbreak of World War II. It is a sad story, but one which will shed light on the turmoil and confusion experienced by the "lucky" survivors of World War II. 1998, Tundra Books, $7.95. Ages 10 to 12.

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
Set in Nazi-occupied Denmark in 1943, this 1990 Newbery winner tells of a 10-year-old girl who undertakes a dangerous mission to save her best friend. Ages 10-14. (Sept.)

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
Ten years old when her brother was arrested by Nazis, Miller, a Jewish girl, survived the occupation of Belgium by living under a false identity. In a starred review, PW said that Buchignani recreates Miller's experiences with "aching clarity," conveying "both a human drama and a chilling moment in history." Ages 12-up. (May) r

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
When 12-year-old Hannah is transported back to a 1940's Polish village, she experiences the very horrors that had embarrassed and annoyed her when her elders related their Holocaust experiences. Ages 12-up. (Oct.)

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
In a boxed and starred review, PW commented that this ``superb exploration of the particular and the universal meanings of a seminal work... moves past symbolism to disentangle the real Anne Frank from mythography.'' All ages. (May) q

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
Teenaged Riva narrates the suffering of her family during the Holocaust. As PW said, "Her story wrenches the heart, but makes one rejoice as well." Ages 12-up. (Aug.)

Christel Brautigam (Resource Links, October 1998 (Vol. 4, No. 1))
Marianne is a young Jewish girl growing up in pre World War II Berlin. She begins to realize the impact of Hitler's reign of power when she is no longer allowed to attend her school because she is Jewish. She lives with her mother as her father must remain in hiding for fear of imprisonment in a concentration camp. Marianne is befriended by Ernest, a visitor staying with the nosy landlady. Their friendship grows and it is not until Marianne sees Ernest in his Hitler Youth uniform that she confesses her identity as a Jew and angrily sends him away. Marianne's mother who works for an orphanage manages to get Marianne a seat on the Kindertransporte and safe passage to England. With great sorrow Marianne must be separated from her family, and just before she leaves, Ernest appears to tell Marianne that he likes her for who she is regardless of her religion. Marianne's outrage and sadness are well expressed in this short novel. The message in this story is not unexpected; people should be valued for who they are on the inside, not who they are on the outside. The twist here is that Marianne, although a member of the persecuted group, makes a judgement about Ernest solely on his uniform and not on the wonderful friendship that had blossomed between them. This novel is historically accurate, bringing to light details of the discrimination faced by the Jews in Germany under Hitler's rule. There is some inclusion of German language for "mother" and "father," which is confusing to those not familar with the language. Thematic links include: World War II; Discrimination. Resource Links Rating: G (Good, great at times, generally useful!), Grade 5-7. 1998, Tundra, Pbk, $8.99. Ages 10 to 12.

Betsy Hearne (The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, July/August 1998 (Vol. 51, No. 11))
Fifth-grader Marianne comes to school one morning only to find herself locked out: “As of today, November 15, 1938, Jewish students are prohibited from attending German schools.” Already her relatives have fled from Berlin to Holland, her father has been arrested once and then forced into hiding, and her mother tries not to be noticed on her way to and from volunteer work at an orphanage. The Gestapo raid their apartment, from which the Nazi landlady shortly afterwards evicts them, and her mother desperately makes the decision to send her on a kindertransport in place of an orphan too sick to go. While the writing is flat and many such earlier incidents have been more forcefully detailed in other children’s books about the Holocaust, the separation of mother and daughter here is realistically moving, with the inevitable anger at abandonment mixed into tearful expressions of love. The ending promises safety for Marianne and leaves her parents’ fate unstated, so that no one with whom the reader strongly identifies dies in the course of the story. A Jewish baker reopens his smashed shop. A friend whom Marianne confronts because of his loyalty to Hitler bestows his most precious possession on her as a parting gift. Together with the compressed plot and easy reading level, this unrealistic optimism may earmark the novel as an introduction for readers unready for more graphic scenes of danger or violence such as those in Pausewang’s Final Journey (BCCB 12/96) or Leitner’s The Big Lie (BCCB 1/93). Review Code: Ad -- Additional book of acceptable quality for collections needing more material in the area. (c) Copyright 1998, The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. 1998, Tundra, 105p, $7.95. Grades 4-6.

Heidi Borton (VOYA, December 1998 (Vol. 21, No. 5))
For years Holocaust survivors were virtually ignored; now their stories are being told. New books focusing specifically on the survivors are a welcome addition and these two are complementary in their coverage of the topic. Yeatts' book (sixth in the Holocaust Remembered series) does not presume that the reader has any knowledge of events preceding the Holocaust. In simple, straightforward language, an overview of Hitler's rise to power is presented first. The camps themselves are described very briefly and the author tells the story of one survivor's liberation experience. Most of the book is concerned with political and judicial events such as the Nuremberg trials and the creation of the state of Israel that occurred after the Holocaust, making the title somewhat misleading. Ayer's book (seventh in the Holocaust Library) is exemplary both for its quality of writing and its thorough treatment of the situation faced by the survivors themselves, both as a group and as individuals. (Be advised, however, that neither book covers the issue of Switzerland and confiscated Jewish assets.) Emphasis is placed on the suffering of survivors after the Holocaust, including the anti-Semitism they encountered in displaced person camps, their difficulties in being allowed to emigrate, and the crucible of violent conflict preceding the creation of Israel. Shaded boxes of text deal with related topics such as the fate of Jewish war orphans, the story of the Exodus ship, and the problems of the children of survivors. Glossary. Index. Illus. Photos. Maps. Source Notes. Further Reading. Chronology. Note: This review was written and published to address two titles: The Survivors and The Holocaust Survivors. VOYA CODES: 5Q 3P J S (Hard to imagine it being any better written; Will appeal with pushing; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 1998, Lucent, 96p., $17.96. Ages 12 to 18.

Subjects:

World War, 1939-1945--Atrocities.
World War, 1939-1945--Personal narratives, Jewish.
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Interdisciplinary approach in education.
War stories.
Historical fiction.
LanguageCall NumberLCCNDewey DecimalISBN/ISSN
English (eng)
940 .5318
059012384X (pbk) : $4.99 ea.
0553282182 (pbk) : $8.99 ea.
0140369260 (pbk) : $9.99
0553296981 (pbk) : $5.99 ea.
055356983X (pbk) : $4.99 ea.
068981321X (pbk) : $6.99 ea.
0590465880 (pbk) : $4.99 ea.
0140345353 (pbk) : $5.99 ea.
0140322051 (pbk) : $5.99 ea.
0887764452 (pbk) : $8.99 ea.
1560060948 (lb) : $25.95
1560060956 (lb) : $25.95
1560060913 (lb) : $25.95
1560060972 (lb) : $25.95
1560060921 (lb) : $25.95
156006093X (lb) : $25.95
1560060964 (lb) : $25.95
0749701366 (pbk) : $5.99 ea.
0553272535 (pbk) : $5.99 ea.
0440403278 (PBK) : $6.99 ea.
0823410781 (pbk) : $9.95 ea.
0887763030 (pbk) : $9.95 ea.
978-0-14-036926-7
0140369260
978-0-689-81321-4
068981321X
978-0-440-40327-2
0440403278
978-0-88776-303-8
0887763030
9780590123846
9780553282184
9780553296983
9780553569834
9780590465885
9780140345353
9780140322057
9780887764455
9781560060949
9781560060956
9781560060918
9781560060970
9781560060925
9781560060932
9781560060963
9780749701369
9780553272536
9780823410781
9780140322057
978-0-14-034535-3
View the WorldCat Record for this item.